clevergirlhelps:

  • Accepting – too accepting; willing to excuse extreme behavior
  • Adaptable – used to traveling from situation to situation; may not be able to fully adapt/live in a permanent situation
  • Affable – accidentally befriends the wrong sort of people; pushes to befriend…
dailycharacterdevelopment:

Things to consider:
What is the nature of the threat that could move your character to betray those they love? Is it personal, or would it be detrimental to a group or society as a whole?
Would your character experience guilt or remorse in betraying those closest to them?
Does your character harbor any significant attachments to people in the first place? Do they prioritize themselves or anything else over their peers?

dailycharacterdevelopment:

Things to consider:

  • What is the nature of the threat that could move your character to betray those they love? Is it personal, or would it be detrimental to a group or society as a whole?
  • Would your character experience guilt or remorse in betraying those closest to them?
  • Does your character harbor any significant attachments to people in the first place? Do they prioritize themselves or anything else over their peers?

(via enterprising-gentleman)

writeworld:

Writer’s Block
A picture says a thousand words. Write them.
Mission: Write a story, a description, a poem, a metaphor, a commentary, or a critique about this picture. Write something about this picture.
Be sure to tag writeworld in your block!

writeworld:

Writer’s Block

A picture says a thousand words. Write them.

Mission: Write a story, a description, a poem, a metaphor, a commentary, or a critique about this picture. Write something about this picture.

Be sure to tag writeworld in your block!

The world is a lot bigger than you and me.

writeworld:

Writer’s Block


In one sentence is the spark of a story. Ignite.

Mission: Write a story, a description, a poem, a metaphor, a commentary, or a memory about this sentence. Write something about this sentence.

Be sure to tag writeworld in your block!

writeworld:

Writer’s Block
A picture says a thousand words. Write them.
Mission: Write a story, a description, a poem, a metaphor, a commentary, or a critique about this picture. Write something about this picture.
Be sure to tag writeworld in your block!

writeworld:

Writer’s Block

A picture says a thousand words. Write them.

Mission: Write a story, a description, a poem, a metaphor, a commentary, or a critique about this picture. Write something about this picture.

Be sure to tag writeworld in your block!

Anonymous said: So, I don't know if you already talked about it - sorry if so -, but I really need to ask: what kind of problem can I put on a teenager character that suffered because of his parents divorce when he was a child? I needed some kind of conflict in their past and I've choosen the divorce thing, but I'm having trouble in putting some real effect of it in his life. Thank you for answering :)

fuckyeahcharacterdevelopment:

For some people, divorce can leave a lasting impression on their lives as they advance out of childhood and into young-adulthood.

It’s tough when you’ve grown up and learnt to love your parents in equal measure, and then one or both (or all) of them decide that they aren’t happy in that set-up anymore. A child should be assured that a split-up or divorce is never their fault… but naturally, they can be led to feel this way, especially if a custody battle ensues.

Things can be made even more complicated if one - or both/all - of the parents then invites new partners into their lives.

So let’s look at some potential scenarios that could follow your character into his later life:

  • MIA Parent. The parent that initiates the divorce, or leaves on account of the divorce, fails to have any involvement in their offspring’s life thereafter.
  • Manipulative Parent. For whatever reason, the remaining parent - usually the divorcer or one that secures custody - refuses to allow the child(ren) to have any involvement with the remaining parent(s).
  • Separate Families. One - or all - of the parents gains a new partner and the child(ren) involved will spend equal amounts of time with each family as a way of keeping in contact with the divorced and the divorcer. Not only does this mean the child(ren) will need to get used to new parental figures, but there may also be new siblings involved.
  • Outside of the Norm. Unfortunately, in many societies, a nuclear family is considered the ‘norm’. The child(ren) involved in divorce may be suddenly aware that they are ‘different’ because of this.
  • Difficult Relationships. Either in the adoption of a new side to their family, or left alone with the remaining parent(s), the child(ren) go on to have strained relationships with one or more of the new or existing members. Whether they don’t get along with their new siblings, or feel mistreated by a parent’s new partner, it can be difficult for them to overcome the differences or find a way to escape them.
  • Insecurity. Divorce can leave young people disillusioned about love and the structure of marriage. It may go on to affect relationships they try to forge in the future.
  • Custody issues. In cases where custody can not be properly established between the parents, the child(ren) may find themselves rehoused, either with a new relative or a new family altogether. In other cases, the child(ren) may be under the custody of a parent who is not able to care for them as well as the other(s) might have.

These are just a few potential situations, you may be able to think up more by yourself. All you really have to do from here on out is think about how these scenarios - or, more specifically, the scenario you decide upon - will affect him.

How will it dictate his choices in life? How does it change his outlook, if it changes at all? What kind of hopes and dreams did he have for his family, and how do they fare now that his family has essentially broken up?

Not all families that go through divorce end up worse off though… so that’s something to consider. In some cases - such as with my own - it was really for the better and I’m happier now with my adoptive dad (and the reconstituted family we have) than I would ever have been with my biological father had he found some way to stay in my life. It also helped that my mom made an effort to remain amicable with our biological father, even though it didn’t work out. That said, the fact that I don’t see that man now is all on my own terms.

So yeah, divorce can be way more complicated than just one parent deciding they’ve fallen out of love. Divorce can be the result of domestic abuse (witnessed by the child[ren]) or other difficult situations that would see a happier home life if a divorce was filed and finalised.

I hope this helps you out a bit… Followers or Admins, please feel free to add to this for Anon.

- enlee

readingwithavengeance:

Secondary (and tertiary and further) characters are every bit as important as your main character. Where the main character has to be the vehicle for her or his personal story — and more often than not it’s a story of exceptions — the secondary characters are going to…

writeworld:

Writer’s Block
A picture says a thousand words. Write them.
Mission: Write a story, a description, a poem, a metaphor, a commentary, or a critique about this picture. Write something about this picture.
Be sure to tag writeworld in your block!

writeworld:

Writer’s Block

A picture says a thousand words. Write them.

Mission: Write a story, a description, a poem, a metaphor, a commentary, or a critique about this picture. Write something about this picture.

Be sure to tag writeworld in your block!

(via flustered-darcy)

Tags: art prompt

cthonical:

gallifrey-feels:

Fanfic authors: READ THE WHOLE FUCKING PAGE

THIS IS ONE OF THE MOST IMPORTANT AND VALUABLE LESSONS YOU CAN LEARN AS A WRITER. I SAY THIS AS A READER AND A PROFESSIONAL GENRE EDITOR.

cthonical:

gallifrey-feels:

Fanfic authors: READ THE WHOLE FUCKING PAGE

THIS IS ONE OF THE MOST IMPORTANT AND VALUABLE LESSONS YOU CAN LEARN AS A WRITER. I SAY THIS AS A READER AND A PROFESSIONAL GENRE EDITOR.

(Source: ivyblossom, via faeriviera)

ttthhhooorrriiinnn:

elronds-eyebrows:

dragonriderofberk:

forficwritersbyficwriters:

amandaonwriting:

Cheat Sheets for Writing Body Language

We are always told to use body language in our writing. Sometimes, it’s easier said than written. I decided to create these cheat sheets to help you show a character’s state of mind. Obviously, a character may exhibit a number of these behaviours. For example, he may be shocked and angry, or shocked and happy. Use these combinations as needed.

by Amanda Patterson

You guys, this is such a great chart especially for budding writers. Sometimes it’s more effective to show a character being bored or excited or shocked without explicitly saying so.

Where had this been all my life?

This isn’t just useful for writing, this is an absolute lifesaver for people with Asperger’s syndrome and other disorders

I needed this.

(via sneakymongoose)

everyoneisgay:

theanimationarchive:

I don’t even have to tell you why this is important or why you should support the Kickstarter to bring back Reading Rainbow; you know why. So go do it!

Please Support: Reading Rainbow

We know that LeVar and the Reading Rainbow team cleared their goal of 1mm dollars in just 11 hours (IT WAS SO AMAZING YOU GUYS), but that doesn’t mean we can’t support them and keep spreading the word.

Reading Rainbow shaped so many of our lives, and the fact that it can continue to do so with the power of the internet behind it… is beyond wonderful.

Please continue to share and continue to give.

Also, you should probably watch LeVar moments after they broke the 1mm goal. *sobs*

(via aspiring--apiarist)